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Research Library
Publication

The Local Earth Magnetic Field Changes Impact on Weekly Hospitalization Due to Unstable Angina Pectoris

    • Published: 2018
    • Greta Žiubryte1,8, Gediminas Jaruševicius2,3, Jorune Jurjonaite4, Mantas Landauskas5, Rollin McCraty6, and Alfonsas Vainoras3,7
    • Copyright © 2018 Greta Žiubryte, et al. DOI: https://doi.org/10.21595/chs.2018.20020.1. Faculty of Medicine, Academy of Medicine, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, 44307, Lithuania. 2. Department of Cardiology, Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kaunas Clinics, Kaunas, 50161, Lithuania. 3. Cardiology Institute, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, 44307, Lithuania. 4. Faculty of Medicine, Academy of Medicine, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, 44307, Lithuania. 5. Department of Mathematical Modelling, Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas, Lithuania. 6. HeartMath Institute, California, USA. 7. Sport Institute, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, 47181, Lithuania. 8. Corresponding author.
    • Download the complete paper, click here.

Abstract

Objectives

Acute coronary syndrome as an acute oxygenated blood deprivation to the heart muscle due to atherosclerotic plaque rupture in the coronary artery followed by thrombosis is possibly associated with changes in the Earth’s local time varying magnetic field as they strongly influence hormonal and other regulatory systems’ activity. This study analyses the correlation between prevalence of the acute coronary syndrome and the changes in the local time varying aspects of the magnetic field.

Methods

Seven-hundred patients admitted to Cardiology Department of Hospital of Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Kaunas Clinics within 2016 due to acute coronary syndrome were retrospectively included into the study. The number of cases per week was compared with the weekly changes of the local Earth magnetic field. The one-year period was divided into two periods: the first-half of the year (weeks 1 to 26) and the second-half of the year (weeks 27 to 52) and more detailed analyses were performed accordingly to the significance of the left main artery lesion. Mean power of local magnetic field fluctuations in Lithuania, measured in pT2 in five different frequency ranges where overlaps between the Schumann resonance and EEG frequency ranges (named as SDelta (0-3.5 Hz), STheta (3.5-7 Hz), SAlpha (7-15 Hz), SBeta (15-32 Hz) and SGamma (32-66 Hz) to distinguish them from the EEG bands).

Results

Statistically significant weak and moderate correlations between weekly prevalence of acute coronary syndrome admissions and the magnetic field intensities changes were found. Higher intensities in the SBeta and SGamma ranges were associated with a higher number of admissions throughout the year in females and the SGamma range was associated with higher number of admission only during the second-half of the year in males. A higher intensity magnetic field in SDelta, STheta, SAlpha and SBeta ranges was associated with a higher admissions number due to left main artery lesions in males, while a higher intensity in the SGamma range was associated with higher number of admissions due to left main artery lesions in females through the year.

Conclusion

Significant correlation between acute coronary syndrome and changes in the local Earth time varying magnetic field intensities was found. Some frequency ranges are associated with an episode of an acute coronary syndrome. Left main artery lesions significantly correlated with magnetic field changes in most of the frequency ranges in males while only one of the frequency ranges in females.