Education
Institute of HeartMath Funding Help

Applying for Grants with HeartMath Programs and Products

The following pages provide information on grant writing, funding sources and information about the Institute of HeartMath’s research and educational programs that may be helpful for a grant proposal. For additional help, contact Jeff Goelitz of the Institute of HeartMath at jgoelitz@heartmath.org.



How to Design a Successful Grant Proposal

Basics

  1. Come up with a good idea.
  2. Locate a grant source.
  3. Design, craft and develop a well-written statement.
  4. Start small, maybe even with a $500 grant.

Long Term Investment

  1. This is a journey involving a series of events.
  2. Do it very part time. Pick away at it.
  3. Many benefits, including clarity and economy of language and some freedom from school funding pitfalls and politics.

Step 1 – Identify a school that has a general need that matches services you can offer.

Is it around poor test scores for a specific school population (ESL, special education, "middle group" performers), burnout among teachers, a districtwide program for new teachers, addressing the motivation and performance of underachieving students, dealing with gender-gap issues achievement gaps among different demographics of students and the list goes on? Many, many educational needs can be addressed by a HeartMath intervention.


Step 2 – Obtain a Copy of the Request for Proposals (RFP) from several grant sources.

There are thousands of private foundation and corporate funding sources available. Several Web sites below provide general information and advice on how to pursue grants for educational products. Specific funding sources are identified further below. Make sure you review the funding categories for each grant funder. If you see a match, either print out an RFP or contact the organization about getting one.

  • SchoolGrants provides a free service with information and links on federal and state funding agencies, foundations and grant writing tips.
  • Teachergrants.org has information on the following: proposal writing kit, how to research appropriate foundations, seven sources of funding, types of foundations available for funding and tips on why grant proposals fail.
  • Education World provides grant resources, grant writing information and grant resources for specific subjects.
  • Funds Net Services offers an exhaustive amount of resource information on practically all topics related to grant making. However, because of budget shortfalls, it intends to dramatically scale back the information offered on the Web site in the near future.

Step 3 – Review the RFP.

Focus on different components as you proceed through the stages of preparing your proposal. For example, when considering applying for the grant, you should notice grant deadlines, funding limitations and eligibility requirements. When you are writing the grant proposal, you should note any specifics reviewers will anticipate. And when you have finished your proposal, always recheck the RFP to ensure you have met all requirements.


Step 4 – Identify one problem, or need, to address.

The needs section is important to your grant proposal because the grant reviewer and the funding source must clearly understand the problem your program addresses. If need be, conduct a needs assessment of the targeted population and the educators who serve them. It should be specific. Provide data to support your need. It is best to conclude with a statement of significance. Don’t be modest, and don’t try to change the world by trying to accomplish too much, because it makes grant funders think your program is unrealistic.


Step 5 – Review relevant research and literature before developing your program proposal.

Go online. To make a proposal exciting and unique, consult the literature to identify proven solutions, interview experts, talk to the targeted population, discuss ideas with professionals and even brainstorm with creative individuals. It is important to funding sources that your program is different and creative and lasts awhile. Your program activities should be described chronologically as though the program will be funded. To ensure readers can visualize your project unfolding, the program must "come alive" for them as they read your proposal. Thousands of grant proposals are boring because the writer failed to "think outside the box."


Step 6 – Develop measurable objectives.

The objectives tell the reviewer the things you wish to accomplish will ultimately determine the success of your project. For example, if you plan to have teachers trained in the Resilient Educator®, the objectives should state the minimum number of teachers to be trained, how they will be trained, the subject of the training, timelines in which training will be completed and what learning outcomes will be gained by the teachers. Be as exact as possible.


Step 7 – Specify evaluation methods.

How are you going to measure each objective? For example, if you plan to train 20 teachers, specify how you will verify the number actually trained (a training roster or sign-in sheet). An outcome objective would measure the extent to which teachers’ stress levels decreased after the training (by using pre- and post-testing from the POQAr, an Institute of HeartMath measuring assessment).


Step 8 – Disseminate information learned as part of your grant proposal.

Funding sources like to see that after you try a new method or technique, you then disseminate that knowledge to many others who in turn may replicate part or all of your project. For example, if you trained educators on the use of emwave® PC/Mac, you might use the Institute of HeartMath’s Web site to discuss the project or use local media to promote the project’s success afterward.


Step 9 – Formulate a budget.

Your financial needs must correspond to and support your program activities. Examine your program narrative and determine what funding will be required to carry out your project. Remember, budget analysts rarely read your program narrative, so your budget should succinctly describe the proposed use for each item as well as how you determined the cost. The budget must stand alone during the grant review.


Step 10 – Describe the time line or management plan.

A strong proposal should include a detailed plan that describes the person responsible for program activities and administrative tasks and the months in which each activity will occur.


Step 11 – Write a concise, exciting project summary or abstract.

The abstract is usually the first – and sometimes the only – item in your proposal read by the funding source. Although the project summary is almost always placed at the beginning of the grant application, it should be one of the last items you write. The abstract must not only be clear and succinct, it should be exciting, to "set the stage" for your project. Your goal is to bond with readers immediately and stimulate them to continue reading your proposal.


Step 12 – Polish your grant proposal.

Now that your first draft of the grant proposal is complete, it is time for multiple revisions. Seek constructive advice from others to improve your proposal and avoid using friends who will not want to hurt your feelings. It is time to lower your ego and welcome advice, comments, criticism and different opinions about your work. Identify five people who can be truly critical in critiquing your proposal, people of different backgrounds, ages, genders, education and employment.


Sample Grant Template

Below is an example of an actual grant proposal from which parts can be used to write another, new grant.

Narrowing the Achievement Gap: A New Initiative for Hispanic Students with Learning Disabilities at Two                      (name of school district or city) Elementary Schools


Introduction

Over the last five years, dramatic changes have happened in our nation’s public schools. With the passage of the No Child Left Behind legislation in 2001, results on high stakes tests have become the primary way to measure student learning and performance. Schools are now accountable for all students’ academic improvement, regardless of their skill levels or classification status.

Supporting the success of all students, particularly minority and special education students, is a laudable goal. While No Child Left Behind has produced some positive benefits, the new emphasis on testing has increased the anxiety for many students – and for teachers and administrators as well. In addition, the increased focus on reading and mathematics skills has come at the expense of subjects such as science, history, art and PE.

In the new test-taking culture, where an estimated 3 million students with learning disabilities struggle to meet higher academic expectations, lowering stress and improving academic performance among this population is a major challenge. Students with learning disabilities1 are having the toughest time meeting the new academic expectations.2 Their struggles show up as frustration, anger, conflict, loss of motivation and confidence, poor academic work, low test scores and absenteeism. The future for most students with learning disabilities who academically fall far behind their peers looks bleak, leading to higher school dropout rates, low paying jobs, crime, social alienation and family strife.

Two predominantly Hispanic elementary schools in (name of city and name of schools) are eager to address the academic and behavioral challenges facing students with learning disabilities. They have invited the Institute of HeartMath (a 501 (c) (3) educational and research nonprofit in Santa Cruz County) to train school staff in their strategies and technologies to help improve academic performance, raise test scores and lower incidents of misbehavior among disabled student learners.


The Need

Many learning-disabled students at (name of schools) come from families characterized by poverty, emotional chaos, violence and inadequate academic and emotional support. Four of these students are profiled at the end of this proposal.10 The need to apply more innovation, enrichment and attention to students with learning disabilities, especially at an elementary school age, is well documented. Statistically, two-thirds of entering high school students with learning disabilities read three or more grade levels behind average students. Twenty percent read five or more grade levels behind.3 The high school dropout rate among students with learning disabilities is almost three times greater than for students in the general population. 4 That figure likely is even higher among Hispanic students with learning disabilities given the fact that only 52% of all Hispanic students graduate from school on time.5 How far students progress in education translates directly into different salary thresholds. College grads made an average of $51,554 in 2004, compared with $28,645 for adults with a high school diploma. High school dropouts earned an average of $19,169.6 Research on students with learning disabilities points to the need for greater reduction in anxiety and frustration, improvements in coping behavior and motivation and greater confidence in their learning ability.7

No Child Left Behind legislation has set a goal of all students being proficient (in knowledge of key learning standards in math and reading) by 2014, as measured by annual high-stakes testing. The pressure for schools to incrementally progress towards this goal is enormous. The consequences for schools not making adequate yearly progress, even with relatively small subgroups of students, are quite significant. These include negative publicity, shifting of teaching priorities and strategies, redistribution of school resources, potential loss of funding and, ultimately, restructuring of school personnel and curriculum by the state. The challenge facing many educators is how to best prepare and motivate different student populations in order to improve learning and performance.


Overall Goal

  1. To train at least two staff from each school to be competent in using HeartMath strategies and technologies with learning-disabled students. These staff would then be qualified to train additional staff in year 2.
  2. To improve students’ performance on California’s achievement test (CAT 6) by 10% over a two-year period.
  3. To improve students’ behavioral performance over a two-year period as measured by a 10% overall reduction in written behavior measures.
  4. To have each student use the emWave® technologies8 at least 10 times per year to help improve one specific academic goal and one specific behavioral goal.
  5. To provide a working knowledge of this program’s support strategies and technologies to all teaching staff at (name of schools) elementary schools so they can use these methods to support the target students’ academic and behavioral growth.
  6. To write a summary article on this project that will be posted on the Institute of HeartMath Web site.

Project Procedure

This project will roll out in five phases over two years, specifically addressing the social, emotional and academic needs of learning-disabled students, grades 3-5. The project will target 10 students with learning disabilities from each school in the first year and an additional group of 10 students at each site the second year.

  • Phase 1) Consulting and Program Customization

    After funding has been approved, consulting sessions with the counselor and the resource teacher from each site will take place during spring 2007. Drawing on best practices from HeartMath’s use of the emWave technologies in many schools, decisions will be reached on a time line for the program implementation, staff training, student training format, criteria for the academic and behavioral goals of each student and use of data from technology and classroom performance to assess progress.

  • Phase 2) School Staff Training

    A two-hour training in HeartMath principles, strategies and technologies will be provided to approximately 35 staff at (name of school) and 25 staff at (name of school) during late spring or midsummer 2007. This training not only will help teachers reduce stress, but also will foster a common language and approach with learning-disabled students. The training focuses on what the Institute of HeartMath calls "the physiology of learning and performance."9 Simply put, the brain learns best when it is not threatened and when the experience of stress is neutralized or overcome.

  • Phase 3) Coaching

    Two educators from each site will be coached by a HeartMath trainer in the use of HeartMath strategies and technologies three times during the 2007-2008 school year and once during the 2008-2009 school year.

  • Phase 4) Using Data and Teacher Reports to Assess Progress

    By using data from the emWave technology’s records and teacher reports of classroom behavioral measures, adjustments to student goals and strategies will be revised to ensure greater progress. Two student data points – one in mid-October, the other in late February – will be set during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 school years:


    Classroom Behavioral Measures include the following:

  • Refusal to follow directions.
  • Disrupting others in the student’s immediate area.
  • Disrupting everyone in the class.
  • Throwing objects, yelling, use of foul language or leaving the classroom.
  • Threatening or causing physical injury to others.
  • Phase 5) Project Summary

    In October 2008, a HeartMath researcher and the primary HeartMath trainer will analyze data (student test scores and classroom behavioral measures, along with teacher reports) to form a project summary for year 1. The report will be submitted to the (name of grant funder) foundation in late October. A similar process will take place for year 2 with a final report being submitted to the (name of grant funder) foundation in late October 2009.


The School Populations

(Name of schools) has 600 students, 80.7% of whom are Hispanic, 8.8% White and 5.5% Asian. Eighty-one percent of these students qualify for free or reduced lunch (economically disadvantaged). Approximately 10% (60) students are learning disabled. On the 2005-06 California Achievement Test (CAT 6), only 16.7% of the learning-disabled students were proficient in English Language Arts compared to a schoolwide score of 24.9%. This gap is expected to widen in the coming years.

(Name of school) Elementary School has 372 students with 60.5% classified as Hispanic, 12.5% Asian and 12.1% White. Seventy-two percent of these students qualify for free or reduced lunch (economically disadvantaged). Fifty-two students are learning disabled. Shockingly, on the 2005-06 California Achievement Test (CAT 6), only 11.5% of the learning-disabled students at (name of school) were proficient in English Language Arts compared to a schoolwide score of 50.8%.


Key Personnel

  • Dr. Robert Rees, director of education and humanities, Institute of HeartMath, Boulder Creek, Calif. A former professor at UCLA and UC Santa Cruz, Dr. Rees just completed directing a 10-site national test-taking demonstration project sponsored by the federal government. He will serve in an advisory capacity for this project.
  • Jeff Goelitz, program developer, Institute of HeartMath. A former elementary school teacher and curriculum writer, Goelitz is the primary school intervention specialist and program designer for the Institute of HeartMath. He recently oversaw the design and implementation of the TestEdge demonstration project at 10 school sites around the US. Jeff will serve as the primary trainer and coach for this project.
  • Mike Atkinson, senior researcher, Institute of HeartMath, will statistically analyze school-related data and write the two summary reports.
  • (Name of school person), the resource teacher at (name of school), will be on-site coordinator.
  • (Name of school person), a counselor at (name of school), will be on-site coordinator.

Background on the Institute of HeartMath

For the past 15 years, the Institute of HeartMath has conducted leading research on the physiology of learning and performance. Based on this research, IHM has developed a system of practical, scientifically validated principles, tools and technologies that help people of all ages improve their health, performance and quality of life.

HeartMath’s educational programs are in use in over 1,000 public schools and in over 50 colleges and universities across the U.S. The institute enjoys alliances and partnerships with a number of research centers, colleges and universities. These include Claremont Graduate University, Clemson University, Stanford University, Brigham Young University, and the University of Cincinnati at Clermont. IHM’s research has been published in numerous books and peer-reviewed journals, including the American Journal of Cardiology, Harvard Business Review, Stress Medicine and Journal for Advancement in Medicine.


Budget

Item Quantity Item Cost Extended Cost
Staff Training at (name of school) 1 - $750 (or more, depending on need)
Follow Up Staff Training at (name of school) 1 - $750 (or more, depending on need)
Staff Training Booklets 80 staff $6.00 $480
emWave® PC/Mac Technology 3 units at each school site = 6 units total $299 $1,824
emWave® Technology PSR 3 units at each school site = 6 units total $200 each unit $1,200
Data Analysis and Summary Report One for both the 2007 and 2008 school years $1,500 per report $3,000
Miscellaneous Expenses: gas mileage, lunch, phone, copier, etc. over 2 Years - - $500
Total     $8,504

Budget Narrative

Staff Training: A two-hour "Resilient Educator" training that introduces teachers at both schools to the project goals, key strategies and technology to help both staff and students reduce stress and improve performance. This includes a demonstration of the and emWave® computer technologies.

Training Guidebook: Each participant will receive a 28-page guidebook that explains the key principles and strategies underlying this project.

The emWave technologies: The emWave® PC/Mac (computer-based) and emWave PSR® (a handheld version) are interactive technologies that show how emotions and attitudes affect a user’s heart rhythms and physiology, which in turn influence cognitive ability, decision-making, creativity and impulse control. Widely used in schools, hospitals, corporations and government agencies, these technologies utilize a noninvasive ear sensor to measure and display heart rhythms on a computer screen as the user employs specific strategies to improve mental focus and greater emotional health. Users apply this new set of skills to improve their efforts and focus around specific goals.

Coaching and Consultations: Consulting sessions with the counselor and resource teacher from each site initially will focus on a time line for implementation, training particulars, student training format, the criteria for the academic and behavioral goals of each student, use of data from technology and classroom performance to assess progress and training on the emWave PC/Mac. Three follow-up coaching sessions the first year and one during the second year will address the effectiveness of the program implementation based on data from the emWave PC/Mac and teacher reports.

Data Analysis and Summary Report: Data from the emWave PC/Mac technology records and teacher reports of classroom behavioral measures will help make necessary adjustments with student goals and strategies. Two student data points – one in mid-October, the other in late February – will be gathered during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 school years. In October 2008, a HeartMath researcher and the primary HeartMath trainer will analyze data (student test scores and classroom behavioral measures) along with teacher reports to form a project summary for year 1. The report will be submitted to the (name of grant funder) foundation in late October. A similar process will take place for year 2, with a final report being submitted to the (name of grant funder), foundation in late October 2009.


Footnotes

  • 1 California Department of Education Web site, Adequate Yearly Progress, Information Guide, page 26.
  • 2 As defined by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), "The term ‘learning disability’ means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which may manifest itself in imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell or do mathematical calculations."
  • 3 24th Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2002.
  • 4 "The Achievements of Youth with Disabilities During Secondary School, National Longitudinal Transition Study-2," 2003.
  • 5 Greene and Winters, 2006, Alliance for Excellent Education, Fact Sheet.
  • 6 2004 U.S. Census Bureau, National Center for Education Statistics.
  • 7 Tamaren, 1993, "The Inclusive Classroom: Making a difference." In W. Ellis (Ed.), pp. 54-56, New York: National Center for Learning Disabilities, Torkzadeh and Koufteros, 1994, LEA Online, 2003, Vol. 10, No. 2, Pages 263-275.
  • 8 Freeze-Framer® (now emWave PC/Mac) Instruction, the Institute of HeartMath Education Division, October 2005. The emWave® PC/Mac (attached to a computer) and emWave PSR ® (a handheld version) are interactive technologies that show how emotions and attitudes affect a user’s heart rhythms and physiology, which in turn influence cognitive ability, decision-making, creativity and impulse control. Widely used in schools, hospitals, corporations and government agencies, these technologies utilize a noninvasive ear sensor to measure and display heart rhythms on a computer screen as users use specific strategies to improve mental focus and emotional health. The users then apply this new set of self-management skills to improve their efforts and focus around specific goals.
  • 9 Physiology of Learning, Performance and Behavior, An Institute of HeartMath newsletter article – volume 1, 2002.
  • 10 An e-mail from a resource teacher at (name of school)                      Elementary School in (city and state)                      where she profiles the special needs of four of her students.

Student Profiles

                     has many strikes against him. His father is in prison; his mom has psychological problems and rarely leaves the house. His 16-year-old brother was almost killed in a gang-related attack when he was stabbed in the chest. After 1st grade,                      was diagnosed with a skin disease. His face sometimes shows terrible blisters and sores. Often, this can lead to verbal harassment at school. As a result, his mom kept him home from school during 2nd and 3rd grade. On the first day of school in the 4th grade, I heard about him and investigated his situation. No home phone numbers were valid, so I paid a home visit. I found                      on the porch of his house reading to himself. I only knew it was him because he was about the right age and his skin was blistering all over. Mom wasn’t home, so I left her my card, requesting that she call. She didn’t call, so the next day I went back.                      answered the door and eagerly asked me if I was there to bring him to school. I told him that was my goal and talked with mom. It was pretty clear she didn’t want him to attend school, so I worked around all the obstacles to locate another family to drive Juan to school.

The very next day,                      began 4th grade at our school. Immediately, all of                     ’s anger and lack of schooling showed up in the classroom. I made a grade-level adjustment and put him in 3rd grade. However, it was still too hard, so I asked a 2nd-grade teacher to take him "unofficially" in her class. She did and                      worked very hard, as well as the teacher and myself.                      ‘s anger, however, kept boiling over. By the end of the year                      was making progress in math and reading. The things that got in the way were all the teasing that happened to                      and all the bullying that                      did as a result of his pent-up anger.

Your program would be IDEAL for                     . He is a smart child with a lot of obstacles thrown his way. He wants to learn and he recognizes he is "angry all the time" as he tells me. Little by little, we are making baby steps in helping him learn to control his anger, but we are a long way away from success. Your tools and technology would be perfect for him because he is a concrete learner, wants to learn, has to stay inside at all times (because of his skin disease) and he is going to struggle with this disease for the rest of his life. If he could learn to control himself, his body and his emotions, it would greatly benefit both his learning and how he lives his life. If he were able to improve his behavior, that would also help the other students in the classroom to learn as well. He can be very disruptive.

There is another student named                     . His mom is in prison. His dad is homeless and lives in the "Guadalupe River." His grandma is sickly and elderly and is often gone for months at a time to visit her other children. His 19-year-old sister has "unofficial custody" of him. However, she has a drug problem. He is on the streets alone a lot. While he has had horrible attendance in the past, this year he is improving. He is excited about learning, but sometimes his impulsivity and acting-out-in-class get in the way. Again, your program would be great for him.

                     is one of six children, with his mom due for a seventh soon. He has a very difficult time with impulse control, displaying all the symptoms of someone with ADHD. Unfortunately his mom doesn’t want to hear anything about that. While he is in 3rd grade now, he previously repeated 2nd grade because of his inability to control his impulsivity and anger. He tells me he wants to soooooo badly but he just "can’t." This year he is doing somewhat better academically and that has helped his self-esteem but something like HeartMath would give him a concrete way to monitor his body and control over his emotions. He is such a sweet boy, but unfortunately his mom seems like she is not that supportive of him. In the three years I have been working with him I have only had contact with his mom once. Basically, he is on his own as far as trying to improve his behavior and academics. With our help and with HeartMath I am sure he can make larger strides and avoid the "drugs" his mom is opposed to.

                     is one of six children and shares a room with all his siblings. His home life is a mess and he gets very little sleep because of the number of kids in his bedroom. This is our 3rd year with Christopher and he is making some progress. However, his anger gets in the way a lot. While he has matured a lot (he is now in 4th grade), I think he would greatly benefit from the HeartMath technology. He only has a single parent (mom) and in the three years I’ve known him, the only time I see his mom is when he is suspended. Pretty much, he is on his own to make his life and education better. He wants to improve and he is trying, but it is hard. He is very interested in computers, so this would be a great incentive.


Quick Guide to Federal Funding Sources for HeartMath Materials

emWave® PC/Mac / emWave® PSR / HeartSmarts™ TestEdge® Products / Resilient Educator® Training Inside Story™
Title I Title I Title IV Part A
Title II Part D Title II Part D Title V-Part A
Title III Title III Title V Part B
Title IV Part A Title IV Part A Title VI
Title V Part A Title V School Library Program
Title VI Title V Part B -
Title VIII Title VI -
IDEA Part B Title VIII -
School Library Program IDEA Part B -

Federal Funding

Federal funding for a variety of program initiatives is made available primarily through state departments of education and school districts for a variety of program initiatives. From the following categories and subcategories, you should be able to identify a funding source that best matches your program needs.


Title I: Helping Disadvantaged Students Meet High Academic Standards

Title I is the largest federal aid program for elementary, middle and high schools. The No Child Left Behind Act increased federal funding to help "educationally disadvantaged" students succeed; it has a special emphasis on large, urban school districts. Through Title I, the federal government gives money to school districts around the country based on the number of low-income families in each district. Currently, over 50,000 schools nationwide receive this funding. Title I money can be used to:

  • Provide after-school, weekend or summer school programs
  • Train teachers and other staff
  • Buy equipment and learning materials
  • Support parent involvement activities
  • Hire special teachers, tutors or aids (usually in reading, language arts or math)
  • Develop dropout prevention programs
  • Purchase technology programs
  • Provide supplemental program services such as test preparation and tutoring

HeartMath Programs and Title I Funding

Because No Child Left Behind (NCLB) strongly emphasizes improvements in reading and test scores, HeartMath programs and products are well positioned to capture some of the funds designated for helping underperforming and disadvantaged students meet high academic standards under NCLB. This includes HeartSmarts, the high school, the middle and the upper elementary school versions of the TestEdge classroom program, which are designed to improve test scores, learning readiness and motivation while facilitating greater cognitive function. Both the middle- and secondary-level TestEdge CD programs, oftentimes used with individual students, can also receive federal funding as well. The emWave® PC/Mac Stress Relief System and the emWave® PSR (ages 8-18) interactive technologies contribute to learner readiness and test preparation, especially in students whose test performance levels don’t match their demonstrated capabilities. Resilient Educator training provides educators with background information and key skills to help them internalize what they will be instructing students in.


Title II, Part D: Using Technology to Improve Academic Achievement

The current Technology Literacy Challenge Fund (TLCF) has been renamed, modified and expanded to continue the state formula as the core federal support for technology. This program provides states and districts with significant flexibility in addressing their technology needs and goals. The primary federal goal is to improve student academic achievement. This includes the purchase of test preparation services and/or products, especially in states with high accountability systems. Part D of Title II supports the following objectives:

  • Integrate technology into the classroom to improve quality of instruction.
  • Provide test-preparation programs to help students prepare for high-stakes tests.

HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title II, Part D, are HeartSmarts, the emWave PC/Mac Stress Relief System, the emWave® PSR, Resilient Educator training and the TestEdge CD-ROMs for middle and high school students.


Title III assists school districts in teaching English to limited-English-proficient (LEP) students and in helping those students meet the same challenging state standards required of all other students. These funds help school districts provide academic and related support services, including additional instruction during the school day, after-school enrichment programs, guidance support and materials. Title III supports the following services to help LEP students:

  • Supplemental instruction.
  • After-school enrichment programs.

HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title III are HeartSmarts, TestEdge for grades 3-6 and both the print and CD-ROM version of TestEdge for grades 6-8 and 9-12, Resilient Educator training, as well as the emWave PC/Mac Stress Relief System and the emWave® PSR.


Title IV, Part A: Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities

Title IV, Part A, provides financial assistance for drug and violence prevention activities that promote the health and well-being of students in elementary and secondary schools, as well as institutions of higher learning. The activities may be carried out by state and local educational agencies and by other public and private nonprofit organizations. The Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities initiative supports a range of needs, including:

  • After-school enrichment programs.
  • Purchase of supplemental materials and learning programs.
  • Purchase of appropriate technology programs.

Heartmath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title IV, Part A, are the Resilient Educator training, emWave® PC/Mac Stress Relief System technology, the emWave® PSR, TestEdge products, HeartSmarts and The Inside Story curriculum.


Title IV, Part B: 21st Century Community Learning Centers

Title IV, Part B, enables districts to provide after-school learning opportunities for about 1.3 million students nationwide. The primary purpose of this program is to provide academic enrichment for students attending low-performing schools to help them meet state and local standards. States give priority to projects serving students who attend schools identified for improvement or corrective action under Title I and projects emphasizing activities that prepare students to meet state performance standards in core academic subjects, including test preparation.


HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title IV, Part B, include Resilient Educator training, HeartSmarts, both the secondary and upper elementary versions of the TestEdge program, which are designed to improve test scores, learning readiness and motivation while facilitating greater cognitive function. The emWave® PC/Mac Stress Relief System (ages 8-18) and the emWave® PSR interactive learning program also contributes to learner readiness and test preparation, especially in students whose test performance levels don’t match their demonstrated capabilities.


Title V, Part A: State Grants for Innovative Programs

This program makes grants to state and local educational agencies that provide flexible funding for promising, evidence-based education reforms that meet the educational needs of all students and other reforms for improving student achievement. Title V, Part A funds can be spent on some of the following objectives:

  • Attend professional development programs.
  • Implement dropout prevention programs.
  • Initiate parent and community involvement programs.
  • Support gifted and talented programs and materials.
  • Implement evidence-based programs to improve academic achievement.

HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title V, Part A, are Resilient Educator training, HeartSmarts, the emWave® PC/Mac Stress Relief System, the emWave® PSR, all TestEdge products and The Inside Story curriculum.


Title V, Part D: Fund for the Improvement of Education

A number of initiatives have been included under the program called the Fund for the Improvement of Education. They include some of the following areas that are tied to HeartMath programs:

  • Assist in the quality of counseling services for elementary and secondary students.
  • Meet the needs of the gifted and talented.
  • Enhance character education.

HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title V, Part D, are the emWave® PC/Mac Stress Relief System technology, the emWave® PSR, all TestEdge products, Resilient Educator training, HeartSmarts and The Inside Story curriculum.


Title VI: Rural Education Initiative

Title VI makes available funds that can be used for professional development, educational technology, parental involvement activities, as well as activities authorized under Title I, Title III and Title IV. Funds are especially geared towards districts with high concentrations of poor students.


HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title VI are the emWave® PC/Mac Stress Relief System technology, the emWave® PSR, all TestEdge products, HeartSmarts, Resilient Educator training and The Inside Story curriculum.


Title VIII: Reading Excellence Act

Title VIII allows for use of funds towards test preparation and remedial services for the improvement of reading instruction. This includes programs that can help students who are at risk of not meeting grade-level standards or state assessments in grade 3 and above.


HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of Title VIII are all the TestEdge products and HeartSmarts.


IDEA: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

IDEA legislation provides financial support to help children with disabilities meet the same challenging state standards as other children. Reauthorized on June 4, 1997, it provides assistance to states for meeting the educational and developmental needs of over 6 million children, from birth through age 21. These funds maybe used to purchase test-preparation products to complement other academic intervention strategies. New changes in the law focus on increased expectations, more coordination and involvement by parents and the regular classroom teacher, and more professional development for all involved in educating children with disabilities.


HeartMath programs and products that fall under the guidelines of IDEA are HeartSmarts, the emWave® PC/Mac Stress Relief System technology, the emWave® PSR, Resilient Educator training and all TestEdge products.


Specific State Funding

Some state governments have funds available for specific areas of education. These funds can include programs to help at risk students in tutoring and remediation, test preparation and other intervention strategies that can boost student performance. In the last few years, some state legislatures have handed out financial rewards to schools based on improvements in student performance. Other states have school improvement funds to help low-performing schools improve academic achievement. To find out more about different funding sources within your own state government, you can pursue several options:

  1. Seek guidance from your district’s office of federal and state funds.
  2. Call your locally elected state representative’s office and request help.
  3. Call the state government information line and ask for help within the education grant office.
  4. Go to your state government’s education Web site. There you will be able to find out the various types of funds available, the conditions for funding and the funding cycles.

Corporate and Private Foundation Funding for HeartMath Programs and Products

There are over 9,500 private foundation and corporate funding sources available. Several Web sites below provide helpful information and advice on how to pursue grants for educational products.

  • SchoolGrants provides a free service with information and links on federal and state funding agencies, foundations and grant writing tips.
  • Teachergrants.org has information on the following: proposal writing kit, how to research appropriate foundations, seven sources of funding, types of foundations available for funding and tips on why grant proposals fail.
  • Education World provides grant resources, grant writing information and grant resources for specific subjects.
  • Funds Net Services offers an exhaustive amount of resource information on practically all topics related to grant making. However, because of budget shortfalls, it intends to dramatically scale back the information offered on the Web site in the near future.

Below are listed some of the many corporate and private funding sources found at the Funds Net Web site. Be sure to examine what their funding criteria is, including funding locations and areas they wish to fund. Some sites do not include their grants and contributions information, but are provided so you may obtain contact information. You may click on a company name or organization to reach its Web site. Some names are followed by the name of a state, city or the word, regional, because their contributions are limited to those areas. All Web sites included here were active and accessible as of September 2007, but sites often are unavailable because they’re under maintenance, have moved or are no longer active for various reasons, including corporate mergers and buyouts.

  • Actuarial Foundation

    The foundation was established to help facilitate and broaden the profession’s contribution to society. Our organization explores innovative ways to apply actuarial skills in the public interest and brings together broad partnerships of individuals and organizations to address social problems in creative ways.

  • ARCO Foundation

    Funding interests include numerous pre-college and college programs.

  • Ashland Inc.

    Funds programs in education, health and the arts and is a sponsor of the ARTS program in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia.

  • AstraZeneca

    Areas of funding interest include education, environment and charity.

  • AT&T Foundation

    Funding interests include education, arts and culture, civic and community programs.

  • Bell Canada

    Bell’s contributions continue to support the arts, sporting events, exhibitions, festivals, technological and medical research and much, much more.

  • Bertelsmann Foundation

    Promotes ventures in the fields of education, culture and social policy.

  • Boeing Company

    The Boeing Company is a committed and longstanding supporter of educational institutions and programs. Our involvement covers a wide range of activities as well as financial support. The largest single block of company contributions goes to education, including K-12 and college and university programs across the nation and in the countries where Boeing has operations.

  • Booz Allen Hamilton

    Areas of interest: arts, civic involvement.

  • Carnegie Corporation of New York

    Areas of funding interest include education, international peace and security, international development, democracy and special projects.

  • Carolina Power & Light Co.

    Carolina Power & Light, operating as Progress Energy, supports programs in education, economic development and the environment in the company’s service area.

    How to Get Grants and Gifts

    Operates as Progress Energy

  • Cisco Foundation

    Cisco Systems is committed to funding organizations that fulfill basic needs within the community, including education, food, healthcare, shelter, vocational training and assistance with earning a living.

  • The Clorox Company Foundation

    The foundation makes grants primarily in Oakland, Calif., its headquarters community, and in areas where company facilities are located. The foundation has two focus areas: education/youth development and culture and civic programs.

  • Coca-Cola Foundation

    The foundation aims to provide youth with the educational opportunities and support systems they need to become knowledgeable about the world in which they live and better able to give back to their communities. Education is a fundamental means to help individuals reach their full potential.

  • Collier County Education Foundation

    The foundation is a not-for-profit organization, incorporated in 1990, whose initial mission was to find, recognize, reward, honor and encourage exceptional teachers in Collier County Public Schools.

  • ComCast Foundation

    Each division of Comcast has its own programs and involvement in community affairs, responding to the needs and interests of the local communities where Comcast does business. The foundation primarily funds programs that utilize communication technologies to effectively address community needs in the areas of education, literacy, arts and culture and community service and volunteerism.

  • The Compton Foundation

    The foundation was founded to address community, national and international concerns in the fields of peace and world order, population and the environment. Other concerns of the foundation include equal educational opportunity, community welfare and social justice and culture and the arts. Deadlines: The cut-off date for receipt of proposals to be considered at the May meeting is Feb. 15. The cut-off date for receipt of proposals to be considered by the board at its December meeting is Sept. 15.

  • Constellation Energy

    Program objectives are to assist organizations that play significant roles in education, health and welfare, cultural enrichment, civic and environmental improvement, and economic development in the communities where it has significant business interests.

  • Corning Foundation

    Supports projects for education, cultural, community and selected national organizations.

  • Cox Communications

    Cox Communications is committed to improving the quality of life in the communities we serve and has long been viewed as the premiere leader and provider of educational technology.

  • Dallas Mavericks Foundation

    Our goal is to support programs stressing education, good health and the skills children need to lead successful lives.

  • Detroit Lions Charities – Michigan

    The Detroit Lions recognizes its responsibility to put a good product on the field each Sunday, but also its duty to serve others off the field. The Lions understand the need to give back. That need was put into focus in June, 1990, when the club established Detroit Lions Charities (DLC), a nonprofit organization founded by the Lions to assist charitable and worthwhile causes in Michigan.

  • R.R. Donnelley Foundation

    Our long-term success as a company depends upon how well we protect our world, strengthen the communities in which we operate and champion the efforts of our manufacturing plants and our industry on public policy issues.

  • Dow Chemical Company Foundation

    The Dow Chemical Company is a global science and technology-based company that develops and manufactures a portfolio of chemicals, plastics and agricultural products and services for customers in 168 countries around the world.

  • Draper Laboratory Community Grants Program – Cambridge, Mass.

    Draper provides quarterly grants to deserving nonprofit organizations and institutions in the Cambridge community. Particular emphasis is placed on educational programs in engineering, mathematics and science, followed by human services.

  • Dreyer’s Foundation

    The mission of the foundation is to promote family, school and community environments that build skills and foster talents in young people.

  • Eastman Chemical Company – Regional

    Whether it is through contributions, educational partnerships, involvement in community activities or by helping to eliminate barriers between business and community neighbors, Eastman takes our social responsibility seriously.

  • Educational Ventures International Foundation

    The mission of foundation is to provide access to quality education for all students. The foundation supports projects designed to enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics. Grants also fund educational programs that promote race, ethnic, class and gender equity.

  • Entergy Corporation

    The mission and focus of Entergy’s grant program is to improve the communities as a whole. Thus, we look for giving opportunities in the areas of education and literacy; economic and environmental development; arts and culture; and health and social services.

  • Feed the Minds

    Supports literacy, publishing, education and other causes in developing countries through grants.

  • Bank of America

    We believe, very simply, that it is the actions of individuals working together that build strong communities and that business has an obligation to support those actions in the communities it serves.

  • Edward E. Ford Foundation

    This is a trust that provides grant monies to independent secondary schools and regional independent school associations.

  • Ford Motor Company Fund

    Areas of funding interest include education, the environment, civic affairs, health and welfare, arts and humanities.

  • Gannett Foundation – Regional

    The foundation serves those communities in which Gannett Co., Inc., has a local daily newspaper, broadcast station or cable TV operation. The program makes contributions to qualified nonprofit organizations to improve the education, health and advancement of the people who live in Gannett communities.

  • GE Foundation

    Areas of funding interest around the world include: higher education – science and engineering and business and management; pre-college students; arts and culture; public policy; matching gifts; and United Way.

  • Heinz Endowments

    Through its five program areas, the Heinz Endowments seek innovative opportunities to improve the quality of life in southwestern Pennsylvania.

  • IBM

    IBM counts education as the top priority in its philanthropic efforts.

  • Temple-Inland

    Contact company through this link for information.

  • Intel Foundation – Regional

    Intel has contributed more than $101 million to K-12 education, higher education and community organizations where Intel has a major facility. Intel continues to focus the majority of its donations on education.

  • J.A. & Kathryn Albertson Foundation – Idaho

    Funding is focused in five areas: student learning, teaching excellence, preparation and advancement of educational practitioners, performance of educational systems and early childhood education.

  • J.P. Morgan & Co. Inc.

    J.P. Morgan makes charitable contributions to a wide range of organizations in the arts, education, environment, health and human services, international affairs and urban affairs.

  • KeySpan Foundation

    The foundation’s focus is to provide grants in the areas of: environmental preservation, community development, health and human services, education and culture and the arts.

  • Kodak

    Programs and initiatives are focused to instill employee pride, build public trust, foster education, respond to community needs and enhance company image.

  • Lawrence Foundation

    The foundation is a private charitable foundation focused on making charitable contributions and grants to support educational, environmental, health and other causes.

  • Limited Brands

    Intimate Brands Inc.’s corporate contributions program provides funding to nonprofit organizations that place emphasis on projects and organizations relating to women, children, education and the community.

  • Mallinckrodt – St. Louis, Mo.

    The Community Partnership Program, our formal charitable giving program, seeks to forge alliances with nonprofit organizations dedicated to improvement and empowerment of communities where Mallinckrodt employees live and work.

  • Marks & Spencer – United Kingdom

    We aim to be a good corporate citizen, helping to improve the quality of life in our communities and sharing our success through the commitment of time, skills and cash donations.

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies

    The McGraw-Hill Companies will support innovative programs that increase the abilities of people around the world to learn, grow intellectually, master new skills and maximize their individual talents for school, work and community.

  • Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation

    Select the area of interest to you.

  • Michigan Sugar Company

    Michigan Sugar Company is proud to offer several scholarships to students in our sugar-beet growing areas. Some scholarships are administered by Michigan Sugar Company and others are by Saginaw Valley State University.

  • Microsoft

    You will find links here to Microsoft’s National Giving Programs and International Giving Programs.

  • Munsch Hardt Kopf & Harr, P.C.

    Munsch Hardt plays an active role in the Dallas and Austin communities. Both as a firm and on an individual basis, we strive to give back to the communities in which we live.

  • National Association of REALTORS®

    Contact the NAR to obtain your state association’s contact information so you can inquire whether any scholarships or education-related giving is offered.

  • National City – Regional

    The company is committed to being a fair employer, a stable financial resource and a supporter of the arts, education, community organizations and civic projects.

  • National Semiconductor

    National Semiconductor is committed to being an asset in the communities where our facilities are located. By actively partnering with local organizations, we help offer solutions to improve the quality of life in our society. We achieve this vision through contributions of volunteer time, equipment, money, and leadership.